Subject Heading Guidelines

In general, use LCSH terms. They can be found in the red books or online at http://authorities.loc.gov/. (as a quick refresher, if you are looking at the marc record field 111 is the name you can/should use. The 411 field are SEE references (meaning they are BAD subject headings that you should refer to user away from to the 111 field). The 511 field are SEE ALSO references (meaning both the 511 and the 111 lines are valid. Each institution will be responsible for its own assigning of subject headings and shall determine its own standards for depth of cataloguing

In general, a subject heading can be of both a specific thing and that specific thing can be an example of a category of something. In both cases there can be a subject heading assigned and in both cases a geographic identifier will be applied. For instance, the Colorado Street Bridge is a specific place which would get the subject heading Colorado Street Bridge (Pasadena, Calif.) The more generic category is Bridges. The subject heading in this case would be Bridges – California – Pasadena

In general, apply geographical locators to every subject heading that is not a personal name. For generic subject headings, ex. Bridges, buildings, etc., end them with space two dashes space California space two dashes Pasadena Buildings – California – Pasadena

If there is a situation where there are two subject headings that could describe a photo in a hierarchical situation, pick the most specific subject heading that describes all the elements of the photo. For instance, only use African American Women if the photo has only African American women in it. If it has both African American men and women in it, use African Americans. If the photo has only high school students, use High School Students. If it has JC and High school students, or you can’t tell that level they are, then just use Students.

Likewise, if a photo only has City Hall in it, use City halls as the generic subject heading. If the photo also includes the Library or the Civic Auditorium, use Municipal buildings as the generic one.

For specific locations end them with space parenthesis Pasadena coma space Calif period parenthesis Old Town (Pasadena, Calif.).

These subject headings can NOT have a year or decade added after them.

Addresses and Street names

Only use street names in Subject headings. Spell out street type. Do not include ordinal directions at all (North, south, East, West). Include full address, if available in note field unless the full address is needed to distinguish between two or more buildings with the same name. Abbreviate Saint to St. Thus:

  • Colorado Boulevard (Pasadena, Calif.)
  • Lake Avenue (Pasadena, Calif.)
  • St. John Avenue (Pasadena, Calif.)

Not

  • Colorado Boulevard, East – 322 (Pasadena, Calif.)
  • Lake Avenue, South (Pasadena, Calif.)

Only use full street address when necessary to distinguish between two or more buildings with the same name:

  • Bank of America Building (Pasadena, Calif. : 880 E. Colorado)
  • Bank of America Building (Pasadena, Calif. : 399 E. Colorado)
  • Bank of America Building (Pasadena, Calif. : 145 W. Colorado)

Also, every time you index a specific street subject heading, include the generic:

Streets – California – Pasadena

Buildings and Houses

This type of subject is for buildings that have names, e.g. Gamble House. This subject provides the name of the building and a geographic qualification. The geographic qualification is to help distinguish one building from another building by the same name. You should always include the geographic qualification, even though you think the name is unique.The first step is to determine if an authorized name is already available. Search for the building name according to the general searching instructions.

IF YOU FIND THE NAME: If you find the name then use that authorized form of entry for your building name.

IF YOU FIND NO NAME: If you do not find the authorized name a name will have to be devised that will become the authorized name.Follow the instructions below to devise that name:

Building names are established by the building as it is commonly known. In general, use the current name of the building. Houses can be distinguished by the name of the first or most prominent owner. Commercial buildings can be named after the largest or most prominent business located there. Sometimes the name of the original developer or builder can be used. If the current name is not the common name, establish a USE links to reference from all the variant names. Establish USE links for other names of the same building (see below.) If possible, when cataloguing a specific photo, add a USE link for the name the building was known as when the photo was taken and establish links to the common name if that is the first time that variant name is used in the catalogue. After that, use the common name only for that building.

To build a common name subject heading please conform to the following model.
Name of building (Geographic qualifier).

For example:

  • David B. Gamble House (Pasadena, Calif.)

If there are additional names by which a building is known, make a see reference for those additional names.
David B. Gamble House (Pasadena, Calif.) is also commonly called the Gamble House, so make a reference for Gamble House (Pasadena, Calif.) which points to David B. Gamble House (Pasadena, Calif.)

Unless the common name is different, add the word “Building” to a commercial property and the word “House” to a house.

  • Bank of America Building (Pasadena, Calif.)
  • David B. Gamble House (Pasadena, Calif.)

If there are two or more buildings with the same name in the same city add, after the name of the city, a space, a colon, another space, and a street name, to distinguish the headings. e.g.

  • Bank of America Building (Pasadena, Calif. : 880 E. Colorado)
  • Bank of America Building (Pasadena, Calif. : 399 E. Colorado)

In situations where different buildings of the same name successively occupies the same site, add after the qualifier, a space, a colon, another space, and date spans for the different buildings. If there is no end date for one of the date spans, add four spaces (for the date) and the closing parentheses. e.g. Minnesota State Capitol (Saint Paul, Minn. : 1883-1905) and Minnesota State Capitol (Saint Paul, Minn. : 1905- )

In situations where the institution move to a different building, but retained the same name add after the qualifier, a space, a colon, another space, and date spans for the different buildings. If there is no end date for one of the date spans, add four spaces (for the date) and the closing parentheses.

For instance, the Pasadena Museum of Art moved from the Grace Nicholson building to what is now the Norton Simon Museum. So:

  • Pasadena Museum of Art Building (Pasadena, Calif. : 1943-1969)
  • Pasadena Museum of Art Building (Pasadena, Calif. : 1969-1974)

When you need to add a date to distinguish the same building name from a previous name of the same building, use the rules above to determine the common name and establish a USE reference from other names. Include the date range of use for that variant and common name. To form the date: Put the date range in parentheses. If there is other parenthetical information, include the date range after that information separated by a space a colon and a space.

Levitt Pavilion for the Performing Arts was previously known as the band shell at Memorial Park. Levitt Pavillion is the current name and should be used as the common name. The band shell title should be used as a USE reference, and they would all would be qualified by dates, if known:

  • Levitt Pavilion for the Performing Arts (Pasadena, Calif. : 2003- )
  • Gold Shell band shell (Pasadena : Calif. : 1930-2003) USE Levitt Pavilion for the Performing Arts (Pasadena, Calif. : 2003- )

Also include other variant titles the same way:

  • Memorial Park band shell (Pasadena, Calif. : 1930-2003) USE Levitt Pavilion for the Performing Arts (Pasadena, Calif. : 2003- )

Separate the dates by a dash with no spaces before or after the dash, e.g., (1982-1984). If there is no year after the dash, put four empty spaces before the close parenthesis.
When you are unable to determine the exact year, follow the rules below to supply an approximate date.

  • Probable date: 1969?
  • Decade certain: 197-
  • Probable decade: 197-?
  • Century certain: 19—
  • Probable century: 19–?

IF THE NAME CHANGES: If you discover that a name has changed and the building has remained the same, a heading for the new name will need to be made. Consult with the database manager, providing them with both the old and new name. In general, favor the historical (or original) name if it is well known, the new name is a just a variant of the old name. for instance, the Brawley Building was purchased by the Church of Scientology. Continued to use the Brawley Building as the common name and establish a USE reference from Church of Scientology Building. Similarly, when the ownership of the Huntington Hotel changes and so does its name (Ritz-Carlton Huntington Hotel becomes the Langham Huntington Hotel) continue to use the common name. On the other hand, when the Doubletree Hotel became the Westin Pasadena (or when the original name will probably be superseded by the new name, or more pragmatically if there is not a separate rule for that building here in the rules), use the new name as the common name and make the former common name a USE reference. Use dates if possible:

Westin Pasadena (Pasadena, Calif. : 2002- )

Doubletree Hotel (Pasadena, Calif. : 1989-2002) USE Westin Pasadena (Pasadena, Calif. : 2002- )

IF THERE IS NO NAME: If you determine there is no name for the building, make the heading according to the following rules.
Determine the exact street address of the building in question.
Enter the exact address as the subject in direct order with a geographic qualifier for the city and state it is located in, e.g., 455 North Fair Oaks Avenue (Pasadena, Calif.)
If the name of the street changes, make a see also reference for the new name when you catalog something that is about the building after the name change. The previous cataloged items would remain with the old heading, as that was the address at that time.

You may also need to add a term for a subject that relates to this building type.

The form is: Type of building – State – City ; e.g.

  • Bank buildings – California – Pasadena
  • Church buildings – California – Pasadena
  • Commercial buildings – California – Pasadena
  • Office buildings – California – Pasadena –

For all photos of houses add:

Architecture, Domestic – California – Pasadena

Sometimes you will also need to add a term for a subject that relates to the building in some way. These subjects could relate to artwork, another building, corporation/conference/organization, events, government, a person or family name, a topical subject (general), or geographic location. For example, for Hearst Castle it could be appropriate to add a heading for William Randolph Hearst (Hearst, William Randolph)

Busch Gardens

Use Busch Gardens (Pasadena, Calif.) for specific. Use:

  • Gardens — California — Pasadena for generic.Also consider:
  • Pasadena (Calif.) — Description – Views
  • Busch, Adolphus

City Workers

Use Municipal officials and employees – California – Pasadena – Decade (if known) and Pasadena (Calif.) — Officials and employees. Add the name of the department in known:

  • Pasadena (Calif.). Board of Directors
  • Pasadena (Calif.). Dept. of Public Works
  • Pasadena (Calif.). Fire Dept.
  • Pasadena (Calif.). Municipal Light and Power Dept.
  • Pasadena (Calif.). Park Dept.
  • Pasadena (Calif.). Police Dept.
  • Pasadena (Calif.). Water Dept.

Add the name of type of worker if applicable:

  • Librarians – California – Pasadena
  • Police – California – Pasadena

Colorado Street Bridge

Colorado Street Bridge (Pasadena, Calif.)Also add: Bridges – California – PasadenaOther Subject headings that maybe useful are:

  • Arroyo Seco (Los Angeles County, Calif.) or
  • Arroyo Seco (Pasadena, Calif.)
  • Arroyos – California – Pasadena
  • San Gabriel Mountains (Calif.)
  • Mountains – California – Pasadena

Golf

  • Give specific name of course:
  • Brookside Golf Course (Pasadena, Calif.) also include
  • Golf — California – Pasadena include if necessary
  • Los Angeles Open (Golf tournament) (1968 : Pasadena, Calif.)
  • Golf — Tournaments — California – Pasadena
  • Golfers — California – Pasadena
  • Golf courses — California — Pasadena

Pasadena Chamber of Commerce and the Pasadena Merchants Association

  • Pasadena Chamber of Commerce (Pasadena, Calif.)
  • Pasadena Merchants Association (Pasadena, Calif.) for specific. Use
  • Boards of Trade – California – Pasadena for generic

Pasadena City Hall: Pasadena has been blessed with 8 City Halls. Unfortunately most of them were basically on the same intersection, so designating by street name is not helpful. Fortunately, we don’t have photos of most of them.

  • Pasadena City Hall (Pasadena, Calif. : 1927-)
  • Pasadena City Hall (Pasadena, Calif. : 1903-1927)
  • Pasadena City Hall (Pasadena, Calif. : 1893-1903)
  • Pasadena City Hall (Pasadena, Calif. : 1889-1893)
  • Pasadena City Hall (Pasadena, Calif. : 1887-1889)
  • Pasadena City Hall (Pasadena, Calif. : Jan, 1887-Mar, 1887)
  • Pasadena City Hall (Pasadena, Calif. : 1886-1887)
  • Pasadena City Hall (Pasadena, Calif. : Jun, 1886-Aug, 1886)

Please also use: City halls – California – Pasadena

If needed also use:

  • Pasadena Civic Center (Pasadena, Calif.)
  • Civic Centers – California – Pasadena

Pasadena Police Department

Use Pasadena (Calif.). Police Dept. for the department name. Use Police – California – Pasadena for generic,

Pasadena Public Library

The Subject heading for the library is Pasadena Public Library. Add an additional subject heading for the particular branch:

  • Allendale Library (Pasadena, Calif.)
  • Hastings Ranch Library (Pasadena, Calif.)
  • Hill Avenue Library (Pasadena, Calif.)
  • La Pintoresca Library (Pasadena, Calif.)
  • Lamanda Park Library (Pasadena, Calif. : 1927-1968)
  • Lamanda Park Library (Pasadena, Calif. : 1968-1968)
  • Linda Vista Library (Pasadena, Calif.)
  • San Rafael Library (Pasadena, Calif.)
  • Santa Catalina Library (Pasadena, Calif.)
  • Villa Parke Library (Pasadena, Calif.)

For Central

  • Central Library (Pasadena, Calif. : 1884-1890)
  • Central Library (Pasadena, Calif. : 1890-1927)
  • Central Library (Pasadena, Calif. : 1927- )

Also use: Library buildings – California – Pasadena

Pasadena Light and Power Department

Use Pasadena (Calif.). Municipal Light and Power Dept. for specific. Use Public Utilities – California – Pasadena – Decade for generic.

Personal Names

The general convention is last name coma space First name space middle initial or name:

  • Smith, John Franklin

In general we do not include honorifics such as Dr., Rev., and PhD.. So Revered William Turner, would be just:

  • Turner, William

There are two exceptions, Mrs. when only the husband’s name is used, and Jr. or Sr. or III

We use the Mrs. when we need the Mrs. to distinguish between woman’s name and her husband’s. If there are some articles which use her first name and others that don’t, use her real first name as the subject and include a SEE reference from the married name
Smith, Mrs. John Franklin (first name unknown)

  • Jones, Mrs. Ted SEE Jones, Mary (if known)
  • Jones, Mary

Theoretically we should not use Sr. and Jr and III and we are supposed to use birth and death dates to distinguish people, but since that is too much trouble, we will use the Sr. and the Jr. When the person has a middle initial or name, use a coma following the middle name to separate it from the Jr. or the Sr..

  • Smith, Fred Tyler, Jr.
  • Jones, Hank W., Sr.
  • Scott, Bill, III

In general, do not use dates of birth and death, even when available. Only use birth and death dates when necessary to distinguish between individuals with the same name.

We do not use institutional affiliation as part of a name authority field because either we do not know the affiliation of the person and it would be too much trouble to determine, or more importantly perhaps, an individual can belong to many institutions over time. Jack Scott was a president of PCC and a California state senator and one search should pull up all the Jack Scott photos. Institutional affiliation can be captured in either the note field or with additional subject headings such as School Administrators – California – Pasadena, and Pasadena City College (Pasadena, Calif.)

In general, add generic subject headings as appropriate. For photos containing ethnic groupings or women use LCSH headings.

  • African Americans – California – Pasadena
  • African American Women – California – Pasadena
  • Hispanic Americans – California – Pasadena
  • Japanese Americans – California – Pasadena
  • Women – California – Pasadena

Also use specific nouns to describe groups of people, if appropriate:

  • Golfers – California – Pasadena
  • Students – California – Pasadena
  • Junior college students – California – Pasadena
  • High school students – California – Pasadena
  • Construction workers – California – Pasadena

If there is a situation where there are two subject headings that could describe a photo in a hierarchical situation, pick the most specific subject heading that describes all the elements of the photo. For instance only use African American Women if the photo has African American women in it. If it has both African American men and women in it, use African Americans. If the photo has only high school students, use High School Students. If it has JC and High school students, or you can’t tell that level they are, then just use Students.

If there are three or more members of the same family in the photo construct a subject heading for that family with this format (no geographic qualifier, lower case ‘f’):

  • McAdoo family
  • Lundy family

Music, Bands

  • For pictures of bands first add:
  • Musicians — California – Pasadena
  • Then add a subject heading for the type of band e.g.:
  • Pipe bands — California – Pasadena (bagpipes)
  • Big bands — California – Pasadena
  • Marching bands — California – Pasadena
  • Rock groups — California – Pasadena
  • If the musical group has a name, the format is Name of group (Musical group)
  • Snotty Scotty and the Hankies (Musical group)
  • You may also wish to use:
  • Music — Instruction and study

Radio Stations

The correct format for radio stations broadcasting from Pasadena is CALL LETTERS (ALL CAPS) (Radio station : Pasadena, Calif.). For example, KROQ (Radio station : Pasadena, Calif.)

Rose Parade, Bowl and Game

The specific subject heading for the Rose Parade shall be Tournament of Roses. There is no specific subject heading for members of the Rose Court. The generic Subject heading Beauty Contestants – California – Pasadena shall be applied to photos that include members of the Rose Court. The subject heading for the Rose Bowl Game is Rose Bowl (Football game). The subject heading for the Rose Bowl itself is Rose Bowl Stadium (Pasadena, Calif.). Other subject headings that should be considered for Rose Parade items include:

  • Parades – California – Pasadena
  • Parade floats – California – Pasadena
  • Crowds – California – Pasadena
  • Streets – California – Pasadena
  • Colorado Boulevard (Pasadena, Calif.)
  • Orange Grove Boulevard (Pasadena, Calif.)
  • Old Town (Pasadena, Calif.)
  • Central business districts – California – Pasadena
  • Football – California – Pasadena

SERA, WPA, Etc

For the various govt. Funded work programs use:
California. Emergency Relief Administration (the SERA program)
United States. Works Progress Administration for generic use:
Public service employment — California – Pasadena